Seasons 9 through 15 discussion

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Seasons 9 through 15 discussion

Post by Toyguy79 on Wed Aug 15, 2018 12:58 pm

As the title states, this is a discussion about seasons nine through fifteen. As everyone (including me) knows , seasons 9 through 15 are regarded as the most weakest of all of the seasons of Arthur with episodes ranging from okay - meh.

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Re: Seasons 9 through 15 discussion

Post by MatthewHecht on Thu Aug 16, 2018 5:30 pm

My opinion which puts the golden age as seasons 1-7.

Season 9- A step up from season 8 actually. Had many memorable episodes and one of the best sickness episodes with "Bink goes nuts."

Season 10- full of episodes I loved when I was ten, and now find dull.

Season 11- A lack of solid episodes, but the quality was consistently fine.

Season 12- Some really good and really bad ones, no consistency.

Season 13- The bad episodes are getting worse now.

Season 14- Start of the dark age. Mostly due to the awful El Boomerang soccer ball "arc." Only three episodes I call good.


Season 15- Dark age continues and gets worse due to episodes being duller.

Also these are not the worst. Season 16 and 17 until "The Director's Cut/Crime and Consequences" are the worst part of the dark age. We are lucky the show ended its dark age rather than pure seasonal rot.
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Re: Seasons 9 through 15 discussion

Post by Jekyll Jekyll Hyde on Wed Aug 22, 2018 6:28 am

You could say that I'm a little harsher than MatthewHecht in my judgement of the later seasons. Personally, I divide the show into eight or so 'ages', each containing the seasons that correspond to the general quality/tone of each:

The golden age:
Season 1 - A few weak/childish plots ("Arthur's Lost Dog") in the first half, but the show picks up rapidly from "Buster's Dino Dilemma". The tail end of season 1 is among the show's strongest runs and begins the show's peak period.
Season 2 - Doubles down on the few weaknesses of season 1 whilst emphasizing what made it great, producing a season of equivalent, if not higher, greatness, with strong plots, well-written dialogue and a goofy but collected and intelligent sense of humour/satire.
Season 3 - The best season (in my opinion, and not simply due to my guest appearance). Contains many of the show's greatest accomplishments ("The Ballad of Buster Baxter", "I'd Rather Read It Myself", "Meet Binky", "Arthur's Almost Live Not Real Music Festival" and "The Long, Dull Winter" in particular, although there are still many others I could name) and few 'weak' (non-masterpiece) episodes. The highest point of the show.
Season 4 - Maintains the basic style/humour of the previous three seasons (albeit with a slightly edgier, more "Doug"-like general aesthetic) and contains a number of the show's best episodes ("The Blizzard", "The Rat Who Came to Dinner", "That's a Baby Show!"), but slight cracks begin to show (more inconsistent episode quality, more moralistic stories with less humour/other endeavour, "Buster's Breathless" being a decent-quality but ominous harbinger for the many insufferably bland disease-of-the-week narratives later down the line, shifts in voice actors, etc.). The end of the Fallon era and definitive golden age.
The transition age:
Season 5 - Can easily be placed in either the golden or silver age on equivalent terms. While a number of the elements that made the first four seasons great remain here (Michael Yarmush as Arthur, presence of unique humour, albeit stylistically different from the Fallon era, occasional satirical Fallon-esque edge), the overall consistency/quality of episodes and an increasing focus on moralistic content over entertainment is far removed from the bulk of the golden age's style.
The silver age:
Season 6 - The first season where the trademarks of Hirsch's showrunning style (more didactic/sedate tone, more moralistic stories, heavier emphasis on dramatic scenes, less goofy humour/satire) fully supplant any remaining Fallon-era traits from season 5. A number of stories are still consistently strong ("Best of the Nest"), but the highs are lower than previous seasons (whilst the bad episodes, particularly atrocities such as "More!", have noticeably worsened in quality) and the season's overall blander tone generates a sense of mild ambivalence compared to the good-natured quirkiness of the golden age.
Season 7 - More consistent and with greater highs than season 6 ("Elwood City Turns 100!" and "April 9th" are among the show's last truly great accomplishments), but also features a few dull/childish episodes ("Ants in Arthur's Pants", "To Tibble the Truth").
Season 8 - A worsened version of season 7, with fewer highs (mainly "Ferkenstein's Monster" and "Muffy's Art Attack") and a number of lows, all of which being the worst of the Cinar-produced seasons ("Vomitrocious" and "Desperately Seeking Stanley" in particular have a preachy, mean-spirited tone that seasons 9-15 would later become bogged down with, in addition to the presence of "Flea to Be You and Me", the first of the Pal/Kate episodes to be truly awful).
The bronze age:
Season 9 - A more consistent season 8 with a few good episodes ("Arthur Makes Waves"), but also several forgettable/dull episodes (most of which are simply cliched plots that push an overused moral with little other ambition) and a disappointingly preachy overall atmosphere. The guest stars also begin to show up more (and become more superfluous/blatant) around this time.
Season 10 - The best of the Cookie Jar seasons. Several good episodes ("Happy Anniversary", "Family Fortune" and the surprisingly great "Flaw and Order"), but bogged down by overuse of guest stars ("The Curse of the Grebes" is probably the worst example in the show's history in terms of 'pointless guest stars') and a few duds.
The dark age:
Season 11 - The first genuinely bad season. Offers only two episodes I found enjoyable ("Strangers on a Train" and "The Making of Arthur", neither of which are even above a 7/10) and a surprising crop of extremely mean-spirited/preachy episodes ("Mind Your Manners", "Buster Gets Real") or dull non-plots with no real ambition or worth ("Swept Away", "Baby Kate and the Imaginary Mystery"). This is essentially where the show ceases being... well, fun.
Season 12 - A largely inconsistent season with a handful of decent episodes ("Is That Kosher?", "D.W's Stray Netkitten", "The Blackout") alongside some of the series' absolute worst ("Never, Never, Never", "Blatant Lance Armstrong Ego Vehicle"I mean, "Room to Ride", "On This Spot" (THE nadir of the seasons 9-21 plotless endeavour), "I Owe You One"). Rewatching also reminded me of how much Dallas Jokic's voicework also sucks (the majority of his line delivery sounds incredibly preachy/emotionless for some reason, generally leading to an extremely forced and unnatural-sounding performance, as if he's lecturing a small child instead of genuinely acting).
Season 13 - A few bright spots ("No Acting, Please", "Prunella and the Haunted Locker") between a steady crop of heavily mediocre/awful episodes (including my personal 'worst episode', "Paradise Lost"). The show is pretty much entirely dead by this point.
Season 14 - One of the show's worst seasons. The fun, wit and strong writing which characterized the show a decade earlier have now entirely evaporated, replaced by dull, meaningless gimmick plots (El Boomerang), preachy and didactic 'character stories' where no one actually has a character anymore ("Buster Baxter and the Letter from the Sea"), plotless PBS mandates ("The Wheel Deal", "In My Africa"), Pal and Kate filler ("The Great Lint Rush", "Around the World in 11 Minutes"), guest star ego-fests ("Buster Spaces Out") and generally sorry excuses for stories ("Follow the Bouncing Ball"). When "Pet Projects" is one of the season's best episodes, you know there is a severe issue at hand.
Season 15 - More of the same bland, didactic sludge as before. with only two decent episodes ("Buster's Secret Admirer" and "Muffy's Classy Classics Club", neither of which are above a 6/10) on offer. The nadir of the show.
Season 16 - Tied for worst season with season 15. The blandness and sugary plotlessness of the Cookie Jar seasons has begun to evaporate, but is instead replaced by narratives which shamelessly destroy characterization ("Flippety Francine", "So Funny I Forgot to Laugh"), are dull to the point of feeling condescending ("All About D.W", "Blockheads"), insult the audience for their loyalty to the show ("The Best Day Ever") or are simply plain awful ("Based on a True Story"). Ladonna and Bud are needlessly added and the animation quality takes a very conspicuous nosedive (to the point of being amateur internet-cartoon level in terms of realism. Aren't 9 Story a professional animation studio again?). Easily the worst season quality-wise were it not for "The Last Tough Customer", the best episode of the show since season 7.
Season 17 - The bridge between the dark age and the current stage of the show's lifespan. The first half is abundant in poorly-written and cliched narratives ("Dog's Best Friend", "Molina's Mulligan" (otherwise "Why Mr. Sipple Urgently Needs to Rethink His Decision and Move Back In. And Bring Me a Cabbage, Quick"), "All Thumbs", the last true atrocity from Jekyllian mastermind Dietrich Smith ("Sprocket!")), but the second half rapidly picks up and presents us with several good efforts (in particular, "Caught in the Crosswires" is one of the show's best episodes since the season 8 drop-off, mainly because it prioritizes story/characterization and entertainment above moralizing or blatant, saccharine guest star appearances).
The second bronze age:
Season 18 - Has a fair share of bad or awkward episodes ("Best Wishes"), but also contains some of the show's strongest episodes in recent years (particularly "The Substitute Arthur" and "The Pageant Pickle", which, while clunky, actually feel surprisingly similar to golden age episodes (mainly due to the humour and intelligently written dialogue)) and a surprise guilty pleasure in "Fountain Abbey".
Season 19 - Similar to season 18 but with weaker standouts. Note that "The Last Day" is a surprisingly underwhelming episode for a (formerly)-potential finale.
The zombie age:
Season 20 - "Buster's Second Chance" is a surprising standout, but the remainder of the season is filled with extremely dull/cliched plots without any real life or soul. The show enters a steep downwards trajectory.
Season 21 - The worst season since season 16. Virtually no real standouts ("Take a Hike, Molly" sits atop the pile at a 7/10) and an abundance of tedious and cliched (or grating) plots ("Invasion of the Soccer Fans" even forsakes one altogether). The show's dark age stodginess has been supplanted by a vacuous, soulless atmosphere. The show loses all remaining sense of energy in favour of once again mindlessly plugging PBS mandates or playing out 'tick the boxes'-type plotlines.

Whew, that was one heck of a potion dosage. However, despite my disagreements with a few of MatthewHecht's categorizations, it seems we largely reach an agreement on where the 'dark age' lies (seasons 14-16 being the nadir of the show).


Last edited by Jekyll Jekyll Hyde on Wed Aug 22, 2018 11:43 am; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Seasons 9 through 15 discussion

Post by Kerry9Story on Wed Aug 22, 2018 6:47 am

some new oesn been ok but more less i been hopin its better nxt time round. soem em aint make no fucken sense ins 17 18 like 1 bout muffy having drmeaz bout toy storez or shit w leepahtnt toiz an all em come out all Oz or some shit. wtf?
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Re: Seasons 9 through 15 discussion

Post by MatthewHecht on Thu Aug 23, 2018 11:06 pm

I think our difference of opinions lies in our thought about Peter Hirsch. I view him as inferior to Fallon, but a key part of the show's longevity and a good replacement. Jekyll seems to dislike his work.
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Re: Seasons 9 through 15 discussion

Post by Jekyll Jekyll Hyde on Fri Aug 24, 2018 5:21 am

MatthewHecht wrote:I think our difference of opinions lies in our thought about Peter Hirsch.  I view him as inferior to Fallon, but a key part of the show's longevity and a good replacement. Jekyll seems to dislike his work.  


I'm personally not against Hirsch's work as a writer ("Arthur Rides the Bandwagon", "Arthur and the Crunch Cereal Contest" and Lucky Pencil are all classics), but I admit to being more critical of the tone of his seasons than most fans seem to be - while it works effectively in specific scenes or contexts ("April 9th" is both a good and obvious example of a case where Hirsch's style gels better with the general tone, as his ability to handle the heavier/dramatic scenes seems to be his greatest strength (the same can also be said of the Bilbo scene in "Arthur Rides the Bandwagon") whilst the Fallon era tended to play more dramatic moments with a lighter touch), Hirsch's heavier and less humour-centric style is easier to botch violently if handed to a misdirected writer (I feel that the explanation behind the mean-spiritedness of several seasons 9-15 episodes is due to specific episode writers (Dietrich Smith, who I imagined stuck around for such a number of seasons because of his affinity for more dour/serious plotlines, with gelled with Hirsch's vision for the show, frequently veered way too far into this direction with atrocities like "Buster Gets Real") and can seem preachy at times, which, when combined with Hirsch's preference for dramatic moments over humour, results in kind of an unpleasantly stodgy tone (almost similar to a lecture) around the nadir of the show's dark age, which deeply contrasted the original reason I loved the Fallon era (which could tackle thematically heavy plots and complex characterization whilst still maintaining a fun and humourous atmosphere, almost as if the show was perpetually on the edge of being self-aware).

Ultimately though, I wouldn't conclude that Hirsch's style is the sole factor to hold responsible for the show's seasonal rot - PBS mandates clamping down more strongly, Marc Brown's increasing role in production (around season 6 I believe) vacuuming much of the Doug-esque tone of the Fallon seasons out of the show's stylistic palette and general fatigue of storylines were probably also major factors, so I honestly don't blame the guy for faltering somewhat when he's run the show for 17 (going on 18) seasons now.


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Re: Seasons 9 through 15 discussion

Post by Kerry9Story on Fri Aug 24, 2018 7:47 am

IDGAF who write it longs it aint rapea$$ $ugapillz (0zby Evil or Very Mad
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Re: Seasons 9 through 15 discussion

Post by Snowth Poogle on Fri Aug 24, 2018 11:14 pm

With the exception of an odd episode here and there, such as "No Acting Please" and "The Blackout," I thoroughly hate Seasons 9 - 15, and it's all because of the voices. Yes, as weak as the stories are, and as much retconning and negative continuity we have, it's the voices that kill these seasons for me, with Arthur's high voice sounding more like D.W., and D.W.'s even higher voice sounding almost like a chipmunk - they don't match the characters at all, and as such, it really knocks the character down several pegs. They finally started improving with Season 16 and 17, but then Season 18 they made the mistake of doing it all over again: not only did Arthur's new voice sound too high again, but it even sounded like a girl's voice.

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Re: Seasons 9 through 15 discussion

Post by HawkNHawk on Sun Aug 26, 2018 1:36 am

Looking through which episodes are in which season, here is what I can mine regarding each season:

SEASON 9: The season starts off not too different from that of Season Eight, and still feels like the series at its first eight seasons. It has a few clunkers ("A" Is For Angry), but overall feels like a continuation of the golden age, albeit with a new Voice Actor for Arthur.

SEASON 10: In my eyes, with the exception of The Squirrels, this season marks the shift from classic Arthur to modern Arthur, with a lessened focus on comedy and a greater focus on message mongering. While I don't consider it a bad season, I agree that it marks a shift from the first nine seasons and can understand if anyone is not as forgiving to the shift as I am.

SEASON 11: Season 11 is the last season animated by AKOM and also marks a slight return to the more comical tone of Arthur past, with the episode "The Making Of Arthur" having moments like Matt Damon declaring that Arthur will "never have lunch in this town again". That having been said, the tonal shift from Season 10 is still present in this season and if you don't like season 10, you'll probably not like Season 11.

SEASON 12: Seasons 12 & 13 started the trend of Arthur making two seasons at the same time. Season 12 is the first season to be animated by Animation Services HK Ltd and the first not to be animated by AKOM. Animation wise, it's probably the weakest of ASHK's seasons, with noticeably poor line work and lackluster digital ink and paint. Story wise, it's more of the same as seasons 10 and 11, with much of the Simpsons-esque comedy being toned down in favour of being just a generic kids show.

SEASON 13: Oddly enough, considering it was written at the same time as Season 12, Season 13 is an improvement over Season 12 in every way. It's not a return to the comedy heavy early seasons, but the storytelling really brings the season out of the animation age ghetto, with episodes like "No Acting, Please", "Prunella and the Disappointing Ending", "MacFrensky", "The Good, The Bad, & The Binky", "Fernlets by Fern", "The Pride At Lakewood" & "The Secret Origins Of Supernova". Also, the animation, while not grandiose, is far more on par with the AKOM years than Season 12.

SEASON 14: Animation Services HK continues the animation quality of Season 13. Sadly, said consistency did not carry over in the writing department. There is one good episode that really shows Arthur's potential (The Agent Of Change), but otherwise the episodes tend to be stuff happens without much in the way of engaging story (Falafelosophy, In My Africa, Around The World In 11 Minutes, Buster Spaces Out, The Great Lint Rush) as well was one of the worst morals in Arthur history to not have been made back when the 90's were still a thing (D.W. Queen Of The Comeback).

SEASON 15: Season 15 has what is quite possibly the best looking art style of the entire run of Arthur (This makes the next season's switch to Flash all the more depressing). This season also marks a slight return to form to what Season 13 had set up, with a greater focus on storytelling and mixing said storytelling with the lesson taught in each episode ("Muffy's Classy Classics Club", "Best Enemies", "To Eat Or Not To Eat", "Buster's Secret Admirer"). That having been said, there are still several signs of the show becoming just another edutainment show littered throughout the season ("Whistling In The Wind", "S.W.E.A.T.", "Buster's Carpool Catastrophe") and overall still serves as a weak send of to the show's hand drawn years.

Overall, Seasons 9 through 15 mark a significant change from the Arthur that most are familiar with. While Seasons 1 through 8 were largely focused on trying to make a funny comedy show that could be enjoyed by all ages while still bringing out good, useful messages (or at least what was considered a good useful message in 1996), Once the show reached it's double digits seasons, Arthur leaned more heavily into being just another generic edutainment kids show, with much of the comedy that made the first eight seasons so popular being sparse and most of the episodes being more in line with Dora The Explorer than Dora Winifred. The pre-school episodes and the Kate and Pal episodes especially feel this shift towards a more younger show. Nowadays, the only times the show really gets to shine is when it has an especially great message to teach and, with its greater focus towards more generic lessons, the great messages are fewer and far between. Even when the episode's message was bad, classic Arthur was still able to make some entertainment out of the experience ("Draw!" had the Fudge song, "Meek For A Week" has the entire soda pop metaphor, "Brother, Can You Spare A Clarinet" has Binky near maniacal act of vengeance). I can point to good episodes from the later seasons like "The Agent Of Change", "So Funny I Forgot To Laugh", "Shelter From The Storm", "Arthur Takes A Stand" and "The Last Tough Customer" as evidence against Arthur supposedly being in seasonal rot, but those still prove the point; classic Arthur works for all ages, modern Arthur, not counting the aforementioned exceptions, is primarily a toddlers' show.

Except Season 21. Season 21 was actually a return to form.

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Re: Seasons 9 through 15 discussion

Post by A Lotta Moms on Mon Aug 27, 2018 8:39 am

Excellent assessment, and one I tend to agree with.  Earlier episodes didn't ever really come off like they were trying too hard to push a moral, because they managed to do so in a seamless manner that blended so well with the flow of the plot and natural character interactions.  Some of the best episodes from that era weren't even all that message-heavy, an focused on the simple realities of growing up during that period in one's life.  Take "The Long, Dull Winter," for instance.  It was entertaining from start to finish on so many levels, but didn't really seem like it was going out of its way to accomplish what it set out to do.  It was a truth about the seasonal school cycle and how kids deal with it. It didn't need to be anything else.

It's also quite true that, while some of the show's best episodes have ironically surfaced in later seasons, they're more the exception than the rule.  Is it enough to still keep me watching consistently?  Absolutely.  Do I feel as consistently satisfied?  Absolutely not.
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Slightly Off Topic:

Post by In_Correct on Mon Sep 03, 2018 5:44 pm

My summary is slightly off topic be cause I have not paid much attention to Arthur after season 6. I have many favourite episodes for the most recent seasons, but I can never remember which seasons they are in.

Basically in season one they have 60 episodes. They should have kept going at this pace. The characters enjoy the fresh air (some thing no body ever does any more) and at the same time there is plenty of conflict. There are plenty of episodes where D.W. schemes to get what ever she wants. I love the fictional brands and also the spoof brands. I love the style of the episodes, the slightly scratchy voices of Arthur & D.W. (which is very believe able) , and also there many characters and also settings that seem to be abandoned in later seasons.

After season one, they did not make as many episodes, with fewer episodes each season.

Season 2 has episodes with out Buster in them. It is nice to have a break from him. The other characters get to have more lines during these episodes.

Season 3 still has gritty episodes with plenty of conflict. and also humor. One example is Arthur & D.W. Clean Up [Their Rooms]. It is just as good as that episode when they fight about the drawings and D.W. says she drew "a stick in the Park Where You PROMISED TO TAKE ME TO DAY!"

Season 4 began the 20 or less episodes but the episodes are still enjoy able. Season 4 has the character's voices age slightly. I think it is Brain and D.W. Read.

Season 5 has Arthur's voice changing. They replaced The Brain's voice actor after one or two seasons of a deeper voice.

Season 6 had many improvements, but it is this same season which they are going down hill at the same time. You finally get to have Emily's original book hair style (but still with yellow hair), I love the remixed "You Can Fly!" end theme music which did get past this season. And frankly, I have absolutely no problem with Justin Bradley as Arthur. I had all ways thought that it was still Michael Yarmush trying to sound younger and they should have kept him in stead of having his lines re recorded. This also happened with "Whatever Happened To Robot Jones?". The original versions are best.

They also introduced The Molinas, Mr. Sipple (an example of a forgotten character) is off to Cabbage Island. In his place are now a bunch of silly people that can easily be confused with any other Spanish Speaking character where they have thick accents and are almost all ways smiling on P.B.S. and also Dora The Explorer And Go Diego Go. And the silly El Boomerang. This is not the first time they retire characters. It gets even worse. They retired Arthur's piano teacher who I am certain that she never appeared in any episodes before the episode she was written out of. They are now creating characters just to write them out.

After season 6, I have always been confused. But that more recent Halloween special is nothing as good as "What Scared Sue Ellen" and "The Fright Stuff". And if you watch the "Paraphernalia Wagon" scenes from Halloween Is Grinch Night, it is filled with fast paced monsters chasing Eukariah Who (the protagonist) with a complete orchestra of suspenseful music in the back ground. The Halloween Special (that hour long one) had some monster scene which was too slow, too quiet, and too boring.

I know I should pay more attention to the more recent seasons, but the moment when they dropped the episodes to 20 episodes (10 broadcasts) or less each season, they began to forget many characters and settings ... As for the characters they did not for get about, they abandoned the character development.

There is some thing I not iced about some recent season or seasons where Muffy has forgotten her limo and her bicycle and in stead they have Bailey riding some bizarre Bicycle with Muffy riding in the second seat. This is another reason why I did not want to watch Arthur.

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Re: Seasons 9 through 15 discussion

Post by HAAnimation on Tue Sep 11, 2018 2:15 pm

They're not the weakest seasons, I think everyone agrees that the show got really bad from Season 16 onward when they switched to flash animation

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